Though thanks for blessing should be constant and enduring, I have found I often fall into despair and doubt shortly after crisis is averted and new problems present themselves. In that cyclical faith struggle, I so soon forget what I just learned: God is always present. Part four of “Glory of the Lord” faces that proclivity head-on, aggressively asserting faith and hope despite evident reasons for despair. While I cannot say I have always embraced hope so easily and readily as it is in this Enunciation; it is what I am forever striving for. Perhaps, then, this part of the mass is an opening up my heart to God in deep hope that this profound faith will someday not just be possible, but real.

Here is the making of that, The Enunciation of Hope:

P. O, surely sickness calls my name
And calamities consume me!
The wrath of the Lord crushes all my bones
And evil stirs from every corner of my house.
There is no safety in this life; I am a desolation.

R. True God: try me well unto my death; even so shall I live.

P. O, whither the water flows, my mouth is dry
And to eat I have not bread nor honey.
The emptiness of my soul shrouds all my thoughts
For the wanderings of my mind
Stray far from You, God of my spirit.

R. True God: try me well unto my death; even so shall I live.

P. O, days mount upon days in sadness
And there is no end to my weeping;
My tears fall from a well that will not dry.
No thing causes me a happiness;
No reason have I for rejoicing.

R. True God: try me well unto my death; even so shall I live.

P. O, when shall light return to me
And when will the darkness cry out?
For there are plagues of every kind across these lands.
Not even in the shelter of Your house
Is there a refuge.

R. True God: try me well unto my death; even so shall I live.

P. O, how do I not know your ways, my God?
For suffering is your namesake and anger your rod.
Am I forever to walk with the hand of evil
At my unrighteous back?
Is there a day of coming for my Lord?

R. True God: try me well unto my death; even so shall I live.